OSLC Intervention Programs on Best Practices Lists

Over the past decade, a variety of federal agencies and private foundations have created “best practices” lists for intervention and prevention programs targeting children and families. Programs on these lists are usually also considered “evidence-based,” a designation that refers to the high quality of research evidence that has accrued about the program.

In a recent survey of 12 best practice lists relevant to children and families, 21 programs appeared on 3 or more lists. Amongst the recurring programs, 23% of programs were developed by OSLC scientists, an additional 23% were directly derived from an OSLC program, and a further 33% included at least some OSLC program elements.

Programs developed by or in collaboration with OSLC scientists appear regularly on best practice lists: Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO; created by Patricia Chamberlain and colleagues), Keeping Foster and Kin Parents Supported and Trained (KEEP), GenerationPMTO (formerly Parent Management Training, the original OSLC program created by Jerry Patterson, John Reid, and colleagues), and Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT; created by John Reid and colleagues).

Clinical Intervention Programs

Treatment Foster Care Oregon (TFCO; formerly Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care)

  • The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare
    TFCO – Adolescents
  • The California Evidence-Based Clearinghouse for Child Welfare
    TFCO for Preschoolers
  • Blueprints for Healthy Youth Development
    Certified Model Program
  • Child Trends
    What Works Programs
  • Washington State Institute for Public Policy
    Benefit-Cost Information
  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice
    Strengthening America’s Families
  • U.S. Department of Education
    Safe and Drug Free Schools 2001 Exemplary and Promising Programs
  • U.S. Surgeon General
    Youth Violence: A Report of the Surgeon General (2001). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    SAMHSA Model Programs
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Thornton, T. N., Craft, C. A., Dahlberg, L. L., Lynch, B. S., & Baer, K. (2002). Best practices of youth violence prevention: A sourcebook for community action (Rev.). Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

GenerationPMTO (formerly Parent Management Training)

  • American Psychological Association
    Brestan, E., & Eyberg, S. (1998). Effective psychosocial treatments of conduct disordered children and adolescents: 29 years, 82 studies, and 5,272 kids. Journal of Clinical Child Psychology, 27, 180-189.
  • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Webster-Stratton, C., & Taylor, T. (2001). Nipping early risk factors in the bud: Preventing substance abuse, delinquency, and violence in adolescence through interventions targeted at young children (0-8 years). Prevention Science, 2 (3), 165-192.
  • Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Greenberg, M. T., Domitrovich, C., & Bumbarger, B. (1999). Prevention mental disorders in school-age children: A review of the effectiveness of prevention programs. University Park, PA: College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University.
  • Office of Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice
    Saunders, B. E., Berliner, L., & Hanson, R. F. (2001). Guidelines for the Psychosocial Treatment of Intrafamilial Child Physical and Sexual Abuse (Final Draft Report, July 31, 2001). Charleston, SC: Authors.

Parenting Through Change

  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    SAMHSA Model Programs

Prevention Programs

KEEPING FOSTER AND KIN PARENTS SUPPORTED AND TRAINED (KEEP) & KEEP SAFE

Linking the Interests of Families and Teachers (LIFT)

  • Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Colorado Division of Criminal Justice; and the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency
    Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence, Blueprints for Violence Prevention
  • Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Webster-Stratton, C., & Taylor, T. (2001). Nipping early risk factors in the bud: Preventing substance abuse, delinquency, and violence in adolescence through interventions targeted at young children (0-8 years). Prevention Science, 2 (3), 165-192.
  • Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Greenberg, M. T., Domitrovich, C., & Bumbarger, B. (1999). Prevention mental disorders in school-age children: A review of the effectiveness of prevention programs. University Park, PA: College of Health and Human Development, Pennsylvania State University.
  • U.S. Department of Education
    Safe and Drug Free Schools 2001 Exemplary and Promising Programs
  • U.S. Surgeon General
    Youth Violence: A Report of the Surgeon General (2001). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    SAMHSA Model Programs
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
    Thornton, T. N., Craft, C. A., Dahlberg, L. L., Lynch, B. S., & Baer, K. (2002). Best practices of youth violence prevention: A sourcebook for community action (Rev.). Atlanta: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.