DEI Resources

Below is a shared resource list compiled by staff. This is not intended to be comprehensive, but rather to serve as a starting point for those interested in learning more.

Resources related to racial justice:

  • What to do each day: Choose how much time you have each day to become more informed as step one to becoming an active ally to the black community. On this document are links to the learning resources and a schedule of what to do each day.
  • So You Want to Talk About Race: Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to “model minorities” in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.
  • First, Listen. Then, Learn: Anti-Racism Resources for White People: A list of book recommendations, resources for children and young adults, articles, videos, movies, podcasts, organizations, and social media accounts
  • Flip the Script: Race & Ethnicity in the Workplace: Even with the best intentions, we can say or do things that are offensive or hurtful. Getting past these missteps means recognizing our words matter. This means taking action by using words that create inclusive environments where people feel both that they are valued and that they belong.
  • City Club of Eugene: Implicit Bias: In The Schools, In The Courts, In Society: In this program you will hear from three highly qualified and experienced individuals who fight the impacts of implicit bias on a daily basis. Professor Girvan will discuss the broad implications of implicit bias in society, while Justice Nelson will describe the impact of implicit bias in the justice system. Professor Nese will show how implicit bias affects kids in school.
  • The Electoral College, explained
  • The Management Center: Resources on hiring and management, with an equity and inclusion lens.
  • APA Guide for Bias-Free Language: The American Psychological Association emphasizes the need to talk about all people with inclusivity and respect. Writers using APA Style must strive to use language that is free of bias and avoid perpetuating prejudicial beliefs or demeaning attitudes in their writing. Just as you have learned to check what you write for spelling, grammar, and wordiness, practice reading your work for bias.
  • Exploring the History of Race & Child Protection: This video highlights the intersection between racial discrimination problems and child protection decisions.

 

Resources related to the African American and Black community:

  • Why Racism Isn’t Just a Southern problem: This video explains how racism was maintained in the Northern and Western US, including the racist history of the founding of the state of Oregon.
  • The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross: Noted Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates, Jr. recounts the full trajectory of African-American history in this six-part series, The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross. This series explores the evolution of the African-American people, as well as the multiplicity of cultural institutions, political strategies, and religious and social perspectives they developed — forging their own history, culture and society against unimaginable odds. Commencing with the origins of slavery in Africa, the series moves through five centuries of remarkable historic events right up to the present.
  • From MLK to #BlackLivesMatter: A Throughline for Young Students: When it comes to making civil rights movements of the past accessible for young students, the connections to the present are right in front of us.
  • History of Juneteenth: Website dedicated to the holiday commemorating the end of slavery in the United States.
  • What is Juneteenth?
  • Juneteenth events in Oregon
  • Oregon Experience: Vanport: During the early 1940s, Vanport, Oregon, was the second largest city in the state, with a sizeable African American population. But on a Sunday afternoon in May 1948, it disappeared completely — destroyed by a catastrophic flood.
  • A racist history shows why Oregon is still so white: Oregon began as a whites-only state, through a series of Black exclusionary laws that were designed to discourage Black Americans from living here in the first place.

Resources specific to Eugene, Oregon: 

Resources related to Native American & indigenous communities:

  • Why Treaties Matter: The U.S. has ratified more than 370 treaties with American Indian nations. Yet many Americans know little about the these legally binding treaties, that shaped, and continue to impact, the country today.
  • An Oregon Experience: Broken Treaties: Hundreds of books exist about the Lewis and Clark expedition and the decades of pioneers who followed them West.  But even today, most Oregonians don’t know much about the people who had settled here centuries before “the settlers” came.  “Broken Treaties” introduces viewers to the tribes of our state and explores a thread of the Oregon story that hasn’t been told very well over the years.
  • Decolonizing Thanksgiving: A Toolkit for Combatting Racism in Schools: Stereotypical and racist portrayals of Native peoples fill U.S. elementary schools each November as students encounter historically-inaccurate portrayals of Native peoples in arts & crafts, books and lessons about a shared Thanksgiving meal, and songs and plays with hand-crafted headdresses and vests. But these activities are problematic, because they depict Native peoples in an ahistorical way and perpetuate myths about colonial encounters.
  • Chinook Indian Nation: The Chinook Nation consists of the five western most Tribes of Chinookan peoples. Our history and constitution define us as being Lower Chinook, Clatsop, Willapa, Wahkiakum and Kathlamet. We have always resided in the lower Columbia River region and always will.
  • The Beginnings of the Kalapuya People: Shared by Esther Stutzman, a storyteller who is Coos and Komemma Kalapuya and is an enrolled member of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz. The Kalapuya people lived in the Willamette Valley from the Clackamas River area near Oregon City down the valley to the Umpqua River near Roseburg, a span of about 150 miles from the coast range inland to the Cascades.
  • The Auntie Project: Native Women of Service: Our mission is to be of service to Native American and Indigenous children in need through fundraising and educational awareness.

Resources related to LGBTQ+ community:

  • Asking sexual orientation and identity questions in a respectful and inclusive way: When asking questions about sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender expression in surveys, it is important to understand the preferred terms and language to the best of our abilities.
  • ‘Listen,’ trans teen short film: Featuring young trans actors in trans roles, ‘Listen’ honestly and frankly depicts some of the myriad struggles experienced daily by trans children and teenagers, giving a much needed voice to this often maligned section of the community.
  • Billy Porter Gives A Brief History of Queer Political Action: Academy award-winning actor and singer Billy Porter takes us on a journey through time to explore the more obscure political actions that have changed the course of LGBTQIA+ history. Before that fateful day at Stonewall in 1969, there were nearly 50 years worth of queer political actions that took place but today, they are still overlooked when regarding modern history and civil rights movements.
  • The Trevor Project: The Trevor Project is the leading national organization providing crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer & questioning (LGBTQ) young people under 25.
  • Trans Student Educational Resources Graphics: The Gender Unicorn, and other graphics discussing pronouns, rights, allyship, and more.
  • Infographic: Flip the Script: Sexual Orientation in the Workplace: Words reflect workplace culture. Even when we have the best intentions, our words can reinforce negative stereotypes around sexual orientation. We must recognize that our words matter and take action by using words that create inclusive environments where people feel both that they are valued and that they belong.
  • Infographic: Flip the Script: Transgender in the Workplace – Actions: Even with the best intentions, our actions can reinforce negative stereotypes around gender identity. Be mindful that our actions matter. Act in ways that ensure people know they are valued, feel safe to be their authentic selves at work, and have a sense of belonging as trusted, contributing members of their teams.
  • Infographic: Flip the Script: Transgender in the Workplace – Words: Words reflect workplace culture. Even when we have the best intentions, our words can reinforce negative stereotypes around gender identity. Be mindful that our words matter. Communicate in ways that ensure people know they are valued, feel safe to be their authentic selves at work, and have a sense of belonging as trusted, contributing members of their teams.
  • APA Guide for Bias-Free Language: The American Psychological Association emphasizes the need to talk about all people with inclusivity and respect. Writers using APA Style must strive to use language that is free of bias and avoid perpetuating prejudicial beliefs or demeaning attitudes in their writing. Just as you have learned to check what you write for spelling, grammar, and wordiness, practice reading your work for bias.

 

Find more information about our work to improve diversity, equity and inclusion: 

See our DEI statement here     |     See our BLM statement here     |     See our AAPI statement here     |     See our DEI Actions & Updates here