J. Josh Snodgrass, Ph.D.

Affiliated Scientist
Oregon Social Learning Center

Primary Research and Clinical Interests

Dr. Snodgrass is a biological anthropologist who specializes in human evolutionary biology. His research focuses on human adaptation to environmental stressors (such as cold stress), the influence of economic and cultural change on health, and the evolution of the human diet. He has active field projects in northeastern Siberia, the Amazon region of Ecuador, and several locations within the United States. He also directs a research laboratory that focuses on the development and application of minimally invasive techniques (e.g., dried blood spots and saliva) for assessing health and physiology in population-based research. Recent publications have appeared in the American Journal of Human BiologyAmerican Journal of Physical AnthropologyAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition, andComparative Biochemistry and Physiology. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, the Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research, the L.S.B. Leakey Foundation, and the Forensic Science Foundation. He is also co-director (with Susan Antón, NYU) of the Bones and Behavior Working Group. Dr. Snodgrass teaches several introductory classes (Evolutionary Medicine & Introduction to Biological Anthropology), four upper-division courses (Human Growth and Development, Human Biological Variation, Bioanthropology Methods, and Evolutionary Theory), and is involved with two freshman interest group (FIG) courses (Footprints We Leave & the Physiology of Diversity).

Recent Publications

  • McClure, H. H., Shortt, J. W., Eddy, J. M., Holmes, A., Uum, S. V., Russell, E., Koren, G., Sheeber, L., Davis, B., Snodgrass, J. J. , & Martinez Jr., C. R. (2015). Associations among mother-child contact, parenting stress, and mother and child adjustment related to incarceration. In J. Poehlmann-Tynan (Ed.), Children’s contact with incarcerated parents (pp. 59-82). New York, NY: Springer.