Pragmatic Observational Treatment Integrity Instrument for Child Therapy (TIME)

Based on Research Conducted at OSLC

The goal of this study is to develop a “pragmatic” observational instrument for measuring therapist integrity and skill in delivering CBT for youth anxiety in community-based settings. In such settings, existing measurement systems are impractical (too long, expensive, time consuming, etc.) and/or lack evidence for their valid use. To be pragmatic, the proposed instrument will […]

Project Overview

The goal of this study is to develop a “pragmatic” observational instrument for measuring therapist integrity and skill in delivering CBT for youth anxiety in community-based settings. In such settings, existing measurement systems are impractical (too long, expensive, time consuming, etc.) and/or lack evidence for their valid use. To be pragmatic, the proposed instrument will be developed with the smallest number of items and the shortest coding window that produce scores suitable for supporting the evaluation, implementation, and sustainability of EBTs. This will be accomplished in two aims. The first aim, working from existing observational treatment integrity instruments, will identify the smallest number of items that can be used to produce strong measurements of adherence, differentiation, and competence. In the second aim, the resulting instrument will be used to code sessions from existing trials for different observational lengths (5, 10, 15, and 20 minutes). The resulting scores will be compared to archived, benchmark scores to determine the shortest length of observation that retains the reliability and validity evidence of the full coding protocol. The end product, the TIME, will be a pragmatic observational treatment integrity instrument that is suitable for field-testing by end-users in community settings.

Year Project Began: 2016
Funder: National Institute of Mental Health